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1. The snowball Trinity versus the Father Almighty

The snowball Trinity versus the Father Almighty Who is the real God? A tri nity of persons (The Trinity) or just one person, the F at h...

Wednesday, 2 January 2013

48. Gerard Gertoux book's excellent review: Not a Nameless God - by George L Pullman

Gerard Gertoux book's excellent review: Not a Nameless God - by George L Pullman

I highly recommend "Name of God Y.eH.oW.aH Which is Pronounced as it is Written I_Eh_oU_Ah" by Gérard Gertoux and a review by George L Pullman

"God's name is fundamental to all monotheistic religions. Paradoxically, religions prefer to translate God's name as Yahweh "He Is," Adonay "my Lord," Allah "The God," rather than a transcription of the name, which is more usual. However, the key to unlock this mystery was provided by the famous Maïmonides, 800 years ago, when he wrote that the Name "is read as it is written." Name of God Y.eH.oW.aH Which is Pronounced as it is Written I_Eh_oU_Ah is Gérard Gertoux's examination of the paradox of the correct pronunciation. To learn more about this book, please visit the author's website at http://divinename.net."
http://www.amazon.com/Y-eH-oW-aH-Which-Pronounced-Written-I_Eh_Ou_Ah/dp/0761822046/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top


Most Helpful Customer Reviews
40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not a Nameless God November 29, 2003
By George L Pullman
Format:Paperback
Plato taught that God has no name (Timaios 28b,c). Philo, the Gnostics, Justin Martyr, and Clement of Alexandria likewise considered God nameless or unnameable. However, Jerome, translator of the Latin Vulgate, wrote in his Prologus Galeatus: "And we find the name of God, the Tetragram, in certain Greek volumes even to this day expressed in ancient letters." Due to the fact that these Hebrew letters were consonants, and there were originally no written characters for the vowels, it is held that the pronunciation of God's name is lost to us. Or it is thought God's name should be pronounced "Yahweh" due to the weight attached to the evidence of the Egyptian Elephantine Papyri. Gerard Gertoux in quite convincing fashion demonstrates the inaccuracy of these concepts in the light of compelling linguistic and historical evidence. Gertoux asks (p.114), "Was there really a prohibition on pronouncing the Tetragram in the first century? The answer is no, as, according to the Talmud this prohibition appeared from the middle of the second century." Gertoux readily exposes a solidly entrenched factoid (p.3): "that Jehovah is a barbarism originating from a wrong reading. As unbelievable as it may seem, this last affirmation is known to be false among scholars. This crude error has been denounced by Hebraists of all confessions, and with the support of the Vatican's Congregation of propaganda, but without result." Worthwhile reading, for as Gertoux quotes Maimonides, "it is impossible to have a deep relationship with a nameless God."

http://gertoux.online.fr/divinename/faq/A12.htm 
http://www.chronosynchro.net/wordpress/

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